Sunday, May 11, 2014

On What Cardinal Kasper Said...

I am sure many of you by now have been made aware of the remarks Cardinal Kasper said in Commonweal, ones that Dr. Ed Peters said cannot be ignored. This naturally follows up to my previous post.

I would actually like to parse the entire interview because it's interesting. If you are intrigued by what he said regarding the ineffable name of God given to Moses at the burning bush, take a look at Joseph Ratzinger's Introduction to Christianity. I would argue that Cardinal Kasper is right when he says, "Mercy is the faithfulness of God to his own being as love," and that is justice, wherein God through His own methods, works to reconcile us to Himself, having sent the Only-Begotten Son to die and rise, and sending the Holy Spirit for the forgiveness of sins and through His residence in our souls the presence of ardent charity, so that we might conform ever more closely to the likeness of God.

God firstly could have created any number of worlds, which in some ways would take away the principal problem of this world (namely, the ability to fall) but would bring their own problems. Secondly, He does not have to reconcile us, at least not to make Himself happy for He is completely happy in himself, but He reveals His very self, His being love, in divine revelation in order to redirect man to a supernatural end, that of eternal life in the blessed Trinity. In fact, St. Augustine says in his Homilies on the 1st Epistle of John that if the Gospels were empty, if there was no apostolic teaching, if the prophecies were empty but all given to us in revelation was that "God is love" then we would have the root of it, it would be enough. Of course, he, I think, understood that in order to understand God is love, how God is love in the Trinity we need the rest of Scripture and the apostolic Tradition...

It's interesting to mention the horrors of the last century, if only because I feel that the faithful in the daily pastoral teaching have been given a view of God's mercy that is incongruous to man's fallen state and need for grace. Not that we are totally depraved by any means, but that we are capable of evil just as much as we are capable of love. St. Basil the Great has a point on this in his Homilies on the Origin of the Human Condition (sometimes known as Hexaemeron 10 & 11). We are made in God's image, carrying His reason and as John Paul II emphasized made for loving communion, so that by grace we can build to His likeness.

To be continued...

No comments:

Post a Comment